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Sweden During the Corona Virus
Jun 26th, 2020 by Bill Floyd

SWEDEN COVID STRATEGY A HUGE SUCCESS.

MEDIA ATTACKS on SWEDEN ARE SUSPICIOUS.

KIM IVERSEN

SWEDEN DURING CORONA VIRUS.

“LOCKDOWN” IS ONLY FOR SENIORS.

EVAN THOMAS

SWEDEN DID NOT “LOCKDOWN” –  40% HAVE NO

SYMPTOMS – ONLY SENIORS ARE AT RISK.

SWEDEN BELIEVES 2000 MORE WILL DIE, THAN

THE 2000 WHO DIE FROM THE COMMON FLU.

RESULTS SO FAR – 4000 DEATHS, 10 MIL POPULATION.

SWEDEN’S ECONOMY ACTUALLY GREW.  EVAN THOMAS

Supremes Grant Creek Natives Half of Oklahoma + Judge Orders Dakota Pipeline Shut and Drained of Oil
Jun 26th, 2020 by Bill Floyd

SUPREME COURT GRANTS CREEK NATIVES RIGHT to

EASTERN HALF of OKLAHOMA STATE.  PRECEDENT

ALLOWS CHEROKEE & OSAGE CLAIMS TO LAND.

Court Orders Shutdown and Draining of Oil

From the Dakota Access Pipeline 7/6/2020

Mt. Rushmore Overshadowed by Grand Nations’ Chiefs

Image may contain: 5 people, sky, cloud and outdoor

Read the full account in TRUTHOUT (Truthout.org)


TRIBUTE to CRAZY HORSE (DAKOTA SIOUX)

MORE MASSIVE THAN MT. RUSHMORE.   CHIEF

CRAZY HORSE CORNERED & KILLED GEN. CUSTER,

AFTER CUSTER SLAUGHTERED WOMEN & CHILDREN

WHILE BRAVES WERE OUT HUNTING BUFFALO.

 


GATHERING of GRAND NATIONS POW-WOW 2019.

FEEL THE NATIVE POWER of DANCERS.


“COLUMBUS MUST DIE”  RUSSELL MEANS TRIBUTE


New Progressives for SENATE and House
Jun 26th, 2020 by Bill Floyd

  NEW PROGRESSIVES for SENATE and CONGRESS

BETSY SWEET SEN MAINE

PAULETTE JORDAN SEN IDAHO  WON PRIMARY

MARK KELLY SEN ARIZONA  WIFE is VICTIM of ASSASS. ATTEMPT

TERESA GREENFIELD SEN IOWA  WON PRIMARY

JON OSSOFF SEN GEORGIA WON PRIMARY

 

David Kim    House CA 34

Liam O’Mara    House CA 42

Shahid Buttar       House CA 12

Katie Porter         House CA

Marie Newman    House IL 03 WON PRIMARY

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez     House NY  WON PRIMARY

Suraj Patel     House NY 12  CLOSE v Maloney

Jamaal Bowman   House NY 16 WON PRIMARY

Mondaire Jones  House NY WON PRIMARY

Alex Morse     House   MASS

Mike Siegel    House   TX 10  RUNOFF

Julie Oliver   House TX 25 WON PRIMARY

Jen Perelman    House FL 23

Chris Armitage    House WA 05

Rebecca Parson   House WA 06

Beth Doglia            House WA 10

Keeda Haynes    House TN 05

J.D. Scholten      House IA 04  UNOPPOSED

Lisa Ring              House GA 01 RUNOFF                                                                        

Jill Carter            House MD 07

McKayla Wilkes   House MD 05

Deb Haaland          House NM 01 WON PRIMARY

Sharice Davids      House KS 03

Cameron Webb     House VA 05  WON PRIMARY


How Amazon Kills Union Efforts
Jun 24th, 2020 by Bill Floyd

HOW AMAZON DEFEATS BIG HEROIC UNIONS,

LIKE IBT TEAMSTERS & SEIU, YEAR AFTER YEAR.

 


5 Biggest Corporate Lies About Unions
Jun 24th, 2020 by Bill Floyd

ROBERT REICH – 5 BIGGEST CORPORATE

LIES ABOUT OUR LABOR UNIONS.


Progressive Defeats Moderate Democrat Eliot Engel
Jun 24th, 2020 by Bill Floyd

WINNER JAMAAL BOWMAN THANKS JUSTICE

DEMOCRATS, WORKING FAMILIES PARTY, SUNRISE

MOVEMENT & A.O.C., BERNIE & ELIZABETH WARREN.

JAMAAL BOWMAN BEAT DEM. ELIOT ENGEL

in NEW YORK.  FIRST “JUSTICE DEMOCRAT” to WIN.

 


Kentucky (McConnell) Shut 95% Polling Places
Jun 23rd, 2020 by Bill Floyd

CHARLES BOOKER is PROGRESSIVE

FIGHTING McGRATH & DNC & McCONNELL


KENTUCKY CLOSES 95% of POLL SITES.

SAMANTHA BEE LAUGHS at McCONNELL.


McCONNELL CLOSES 95% of POLLING STATIONS.

ONLY I SITE for 750,000+ VOTERS in LOUISVILLE.

MAIL IN – NOT 4 BLACK VOTERS = VOTER SUPPRESSION


Why Do We Have No High Speed Railroads?
Jun 23rd, 2020 by Bill Floyd

WHY WE HAVE NO HI-SPEED RAIL?

EUROPE, CHINA HAVE HI-SPEED RAIL.

U.S. HAS AUTO LOBBY, OIL LOBBY, AIR-

PLANE LOBBY WHO FIGHT HI-SPEED RAIL.


I.L.W.U. Longshore Strikes for Juneteenth Against Corrupt Police Injustice
Jun 22nd, 2020 by Bill Floyd

The Most Radical Union in the U.S. Is Shutting Down the Ports on Juneteenth

BY PETER COLE

Protesters confront police outside the 3rd Police Precinct on May 27, 2020 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. (Photo by Stephen Maturen/Getty Images)

Outrage over the police murder of George Floyd launched Black Lives Matter protests across the country and world. Most actions are being organized by young black people. While many are working-class and at least some are anti-capitalist, few protests are formally part of the labor movement.

That may change this Friday when the most radical union in the United States shuts down the country’s gateway to the world, West Coast ports, in solidarity with Black Lives Matter on the day commemorating the end of slavery. As Clarence Thomas, a long-time dockworker activist for black equality and socialism, noted recently, “It will be the first time that an international union has ever taken off from work for the purpose of commemorating Juneteenth.”

Thomas, an African American from Oakland, is a proud, third-generation member of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU). Arguably, no union has fought longer and harder for black equality. As Willie Adams, the union’s first black International President, recently declared: “Our union has a long history of confronting racism on the job, in our communities and around the world.”

By contrast, most unions—hypothetically, the collective voice of working people—seem hesitant to take action. While perhaps by mistake, the trashing of the AFL-CIO headquarters, located near the White House, exemplified the yawning divide separating black and youth protesters and “organized labor.” Yet, consider that the AFL-CIO, however weak it may seem, still represents 12,500,000 workers. There is no larger movement of ordinary people than unions. Despite their potential, unions are issuing nicely worded statements but providing little tangible support to the current protests, the largest working-class uprising in two generations.

Some unions, such as the Chicago Teachers Union (CTU) and United Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers of America (UE) are actively challenging racism, police brutality, and other reactionary policies with progressive, forward-thinking actions. Such militancy and radicalism, not coincidentally, have emerged in unions with larger numbers of black and brown, immigrant, and female members. Still, the ILWU’s Juneteenth action raises the bar for what worker solidarity with Black Lives Matter looks like.

The breadth and depth of this union’s radical commitment to equality may shock those who stereotype unions as liberal or even conservative. Harry Bridges, the ILWU’s first and long-time president, once declared in the 1940s, “If things reached a point where only two men were left on the waterfront, if he had anything to say about it, one would be a black man.” Himself an Australian immigrant and anti-capitalist, Bridges made this claim when this union was more than 90% white.

Zack Pattin, a white, rank-and-file activist in ILWU Local 23 (Tacoma), proudly recounted to this writer some of his union’s history: “We pass down stories about integrating the waterfront and our union in the 30s and 40s, opposition to Japanese internment, Harry’s deportation trials and the fight for immigrant rights, support for Dr. King and the civil rights movement, support for Cesar Chavez and the Delano Grape Strike, refusing to handle South African cargo to protest Apartheid, and resistance to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.”

ILWU members also understand the role of police in undermining social movements. Pattin made this connection by highlighting the Big Strike of 1934, out of which his union was born. “It’s not lost to us that the formative moment in our history—Bloody Thursday—was a police murder [of two strikers] right outside the San Francisco union hall on July 5, 1934,” he said.

That’s why Jack Heyman, a veteran Local 10 activist and white anti-racist, recently told The Nation, “if you look at ILWU locals’ bylaws, many of them explicitly ban police from membership. That’s because the police have been always been used as tools in the fight against the working people.”

Local 10, the only black-majority longshore branch, and its companion Local 34, have led the way in condemning racist, police brutality. In 2010, the unions shut down the Port of Oakland after local law enforcement killed Oscar Grant. They did so again on May Day, in 2015, to protest the police murder of Walter Scott, an unarmed black man in South Carolina.

After George Floyd’s murder, the country’s leading social justice union once more is playing a major role. Last Tuesday, the ILWU downed tools for nine minutes during Floyd’s funeral. This Friday, Juneteenth, the ILWU will shut down all twenty-nine ports it controls—from San Diego to Bellingham, Washington—for the entire, eight-hour day shift.

Dockworkers intend to use their labor power to send a message. As Local 10 President Trent Willis, an African American, declared at an SEIU-led protest in Berkeley on June 13, “We’re sending a clear statement to the powers that be, our government. We’re sending a clear statement to these corporate bosses that we intend to use our labor, put our labor where our mouth is. We intend to take economic action if our demands are not met.” Willis was referring to the demand to end racist policing.

When taking this political stand, dockworkers appreciate that their strategic locations at hubs of global transport give them tremendous power. The Pacific Maritime Association, which represents shipping corporations, explained in a June 8 statement why that matters: “West Coast ports handle a majority of the maritime cargo that helps fuel the U.S. economy, brings vital goods and medical supplies to local communities, and supports millions of American jobs.” Clarence Thomas put it succinctly: “Longshore workers probably understand capitalism better than anyone else…If the cargo doesn’t come off the ship, that’s merchandise not sold. Stopping work…is not a symbol; it’s an act that demonstrates the leverage of the working class.”

Willis, Thomas, Gabriel Prawl (of Local 52, Seattle), Keith Shanklin (Local 34 president) and others organized this Juneteenth stop-work prior to Trump’s provocation to speak that day, in Tulsa of all places. An ILWU press release explains this day’s significance, past and present: “Juneteenth commemorates the end of slavery in the United States. On this date in 1865, Black Slaves in Texas were told of their emancipation from slavery two years after the Emancipation Proclamation became effective…our nation has made progress but the changes necessary to end systemic racism have come slowly or not at all, as the murder of Mr. Floyd on May 25, 2020 demonstrated.”

Shanklin, the first black person elected to head Local 34, summed up at the June 13 protest in Berkeley why the ILWU will conduct this Juneteenth stop-work: “to stand up against systemic police oppression and systemic police brutality. We need to understand one thing. We cannot survive in this world no more with police brutality. It’s time for it to end.”


The System – Who Rigged It? How to Fix it?
Jun 22nd, 2020 by Bill Floyd

THE SYSTEM – THE SUPER RICH RIGGED IT.

HOW CAN WORKING FAMILIES FIX IT?

ROBERT REICH


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