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Labor Music and Songs

UNION “STRIKE” new SONG

WILLIE NELSON on Benjamin Franklin’s best idea – our US Post Offices.

 

SPRINGSTEEN – “BORN in the USA”

 

JOAN BAEZ – “DIAMONDS and RUST”

 

BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN “STREETS of PHILADELPHIA” – Full Album

 

JOAN BAEZ – “Where Have All The Flowers Gone” by Pete Seeger

 

JOAN BAEZ – “THE NIGHT THEY DROVE OLE DIXIE DOWN”

 

JOAN BAEZ – “LILY, ROSEMARY and the JACK of HEARTS”

 

JOAN BAEZ – Full Album 

 

BOB DYLAN – “The TIMES THEY ARE CHANGING”

 

COAL MINERS – “Black Lung” by Hazel Dickens

 

BOB DYLAN – BEST Songs

https://youtu.be/429vMj5P4Gw

 

COAL MINERS – “Fire in the Hole” by Hazel Dickens

 

“You’ll Never Leave Harlan Alive” by Darrell Scott

 

PETE SEEGER – “Which Side Are You On?”

 

PETE SEEGER – “SOLIDARITY FOREVER”

 

PETE SEEGER & SPRINGSTEEN – “This Land Was Made For You & Me” 

 

 

 

“Elizabeth Gurley Flynn”  American Labor HERO

Elizabeth Gurley Flynn made her first speech when she was 15, on “Women under Socialism.” She also began making speeches for the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW, or “Wobblies”) and was expelled from high school in 1907. She then became a full-time organizer for the IWW.

Elizabeth Gurley Flynn continued to travel in her work for the IWW, while her son stayed with her mother and sister. Italian anarchist Carlo Tresca moved into the Flynn household as well; Elizabeth and Carlo Tresca’s affair lasted until 1925.

Before World War I, Flynn was involve din the cause of free speech for IWW speakers, and then in organizing strikes, including those of textile workers in Lawrence, Massachusetts, and Paterson, New Jersey.

In 1920, Elizabeth Gurley Flynn’s concern for these basic civil liberties, especially for immigrants, led her to help found the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU).    She was elected to the group’s national board.

Elizabeth Gurley Flynn was forced out of activism not by government action, but by ill health, as heart disease weakened her. She lived in Portland Oregon, with Dr. Marie Equi, also of the IWW and a supporter of the birth control movement. She remained a member of the ACLU board during these years.

When World War I started, Elizabeth Gurley Flynn and other IWW leaders opposed the war. Flynn, like many other war opponents at that time, was charged with espionage. The charges were eventually dropped, and Flynn picked up the cause of defending immigrants who were being threatened with deportation for opposing the war.  She defended Emma Goldman and Marie Equi.

After the war ended, as anti-communist sentiment grew, Elizabeth Gurley Flynn again found herself defending free speech rights for radicals. In 1951, Flynn and others were arrested for conspiracy to overthrow the United States government, under the Smith Act of 1940. She was convicted in 1953 and served her prison term in Alderson Prison, West Virginia, from January 1955 to May 1957.

For a long time a critic of the USSR and its interference in the American Communist Party, Elizabeth Gurley Flynn traveled to the USSR and Eastern Europe for the first time. She was working on her autobiography. While in Moscow, Elizabeth Gurley Flynn was stricken ill, her heart failing, and she died there. She was given a state funeral in Red Square.

“The Rebel Girl” Written by Joe Hill – sung by Janne Laerkedahl  

 

“Enola Gay” by Utah Phillips    Nuclear Bombs

 

“Solidarity Forever” by Pete Seeger

 

“There’s Power in a Union”  Utah Phillips

 

“They’ll Never Keep Us Down” by Hazel Dickens


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